Thursday, April 16, 2015

The "American 'Wet' Dream Mall Miami" Project. What do CEO's in Miami Think? By Geniusofdespair

What do Miami Dade County CEO's think of the new American Wet Dream Mall proposed for the Miami Dade County/Broward line? A portion of our public land was just approved in the State Legislature to be given to that zany Persian-Canadian family -- the Ghermezian -- who are going to put submarines in rockpits.   The  Ghermezian Patriarch Eskandar, promised in the contract, 12,500 (NOT 25,000) "part-time" and permanent jobs by 2030. The press just throws around 25,000 full-time jobs as a lark with no basis of fact. According to the Miami Herald, Most CEO's love the plan.  Here are CEO's that actually made some sense to the Herald's question: If you were given a vote on the American Dream Miami retail theme park, would you approve it or reject it?  (most of the CEO's don't realize this family is giving no concessions...I have it on video -- watch the damn video. By the way, at the end of MY VIDEO all these Triple 5 propaganda video's start playing. I tried to fix it.)
My first thought is yes because I believe every idea deserves a chance to thrive. However, I would have a few stipulations that would be deal-breakers if not answered favorably: How many local jobs could we guarantee above $14 an hour? How many local businesses would be housed in the facility? How much importance would be placed on not just selling carbon-neutral products but on carbon neutral/green development and construction, and environmental mitigation? If the answer to these questions is over 50% I would vote yes. Unfortunately, I doubt that a retail theme park could make such promises; thus I would implore the developers/investor to consider diversifying Miami’s future planning to include local, sustainable, growth sectors like manufacturing and product-based development which would create a less bifurcated Miami.
Pandwe Gibson, executive director, EcoTech Visions (sorry Pandwe no stipulations accepted by the developer, especially not your $14 an hour wage)
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I'm still in the middle on this project, I'm very optimistic and hopeful that the promises are true construction jobs, permanent jobs, a boost in property value for the surrounding residents etc., but those are often times promises we hear that don't often come true. My biggest concern is that we do not contribute to the cycle of low wage jobs for our residents that add no real value to increasing their quality of life.
Felecia Hatcher, co-founder of Feverish Gourmet Pops
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Only if it comes with an investment in higher education and a higher education component, and only if truly independent traffic and environmental impact studies show it is sustainable.
Eduardo Padrón, president, Miami Dade College
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South Florida definitely needs to create more opportunities for employment; however, I’m not sure that we want to continue creating low-wage jobs that will continue to widen the wealth gap. In order to cultivate a community of higher wage-earning residents, we must continue to invest in basic services that help promote success: health, safety & protection, affordable housing, food and education.
Paco Velez, CEO, Feeding South Florida
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All good comments but what they have on their wish list, it ain't going to happen!

Here are two of the dumber statements by CEO's:

The American Dream Miami retail theme park represents a major investment which will not only attract visitors and residents, but will create thousands of jobs, generate significant tax revenues, and create more buzz about Miami as a fabulous destination. I would vote to approve it.
Julie Grimes, managing partner, Hilton Bentley Hotel
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Approve the project. We need a shopping/entertainment experience that reflects our stature in the world.
Darryl K. Sharpton, president and CEO, The Sharpton Group
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We have very little control on what happens here. We have a lame agreement for them to get the public property but once they do get the property which is very soon...no control. They would not agree to the water restrictions that Chair Jean Monestime wanted or the higher than minimum wage that other commissioners wanted. And don't be fooled, they only guaranteed 12,500 jobs (part-time and full time by 2030 -- I predict they will be under water by then, that is literally) in the agreement for the property not the 25,000 touted in the media. This group holds all the cards. Here is background on how Triple 5 got our water when they weren't supposed to.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

If it were to be approved there must be:
1- Guarantee for large number of full time employment across the mall.
2- At least 50% above minimum wage for starting wages on part time and full time employment.

We are sick and tired of being treated like slaves in this town.

Geniusofdespair said...

Never going to happen the commission is too weak minded and so is the mayor, Afraid they are going to lose what they consider a great boon for the county.

Anonymous said...

Miami-Dade needs manufacturing jobs. Terrible loss to the county to keep attracting retail and tourist jobs.

Anonymous said...

We need to elect people with some vision of what makes a great region. Malls are in decline, traffic is a nightmare, infrastructure is in need, water supplies are threatened, sea level rise is critical. Instead of these phony minimum wage jobs and traffic infrastructure nightmares, we need our elected officials to look at the large picture and make good decisions. A new giant mall on the edge of the everglades is not in our best interests.

Anonymous said...

Darryl Sharpton is a fucking whore for developers.